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Transmission Electron Microscopes

Themis Z S/TEM for Materials Science

The ultimate in optical performance, reproducibility and flexibility

Thermo Scientific's aberration-corrected Themis Z scanning transmission electron microscope (S/TEM) combine's proven optics and new, breakthrough S/TEM imaging capability with enhanced automation software to put the ultimate imaging performance in the hands of all materials scientists. Complimented by our unique EDX portfolio the Themis Z S/TEM delivers the best all round atomic characterisation data in a single tool with a single objective lens configuration




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The Thermo Scientific Themis Z TEM benefits for Materials Science include:

  • Automated optical tuning delivering unprecedented experimental repeatability
  • Low dose, high signal to noise and enhanced low Z sensitivity with iDPC
  • Optional 'highest yield' or 'cleanest' EDX provide solutions to match any characterisation need
  • Enhanced usability and imaging flexibility to image a wider variety of specimens
  • Fastest navigation from mesoscopic to atomic length scale enabled with the 4k x 4k Ceta 16M instant-zoom camera

Fastest time to the edge of discovery

The best gets even better. The Themis Z S/TEM couples unprecedented, Cs corrected, atomic resolution imaging performance across the entire acceleration voltage range with fast, robust and completely automated tuning and alignment software for the probe forming optics in S/TEM and for the monochromator. The Themis Z S/TEM delivers the fastest time to data and the best S/TEM image quality for rapid access to crystal clear atomic scale images.

New imaging capability

The image on the right shows the flexible imaging capability of the Themis Z is utilised by combining the benefits of low accelerating voltage imaging and iDPC. The result is a high contrast, high signal to noise, damage free image of graphene where both low and high spatial information is simultaneously observed.

Featured Webinar

Titan Themis Virtual Demo

With fast acquisition of simultaneous EDS/EELS, the fastest EDS data acquisition, and rapid, precise navigation from mesoscopic to atomic scale, Titan Themis gives researchers the power they need to achieve success and deliver results.

Best STEM image quality

The image on the left (acquired with the new Themis Z S/TEM) shows atomic resolved GaN in [112] orientation with clean and undisturbed separation of the Ga atom columns (split distance is 0.063 nm).

High Angle ADF STEM image showing 63pm column separation in GaN [112] orientation.
Power spectrum of left image revealing <60 pm resolution in all directions.

Publication list for Themis Z for Materials Science

Title: Multiscale differential phase contrast analysis with a unitary detector
Authors: Sergei Lopatin, Yurii P. Ivanov, Jurgen Kosel, Andrey Chuvilin
References:   Ultramicroscopy, Volume 162, March 2016, Pages 74-81  
DOI10.1016/j.ultramic.2015.12.008
Date: December 2015
Abstract
Title: Multiscale differential phase contrast analysis with a unitary detector
Authors: Sergei Lopatin, Yurii P. Ivanov, Jurgen Kosel, Andrey Chuvilin
References:   Ultramicroscopy, Volume 162, March 2016, Pages 74-81  
DOI10.1016/j.ultramic.2015.12.008
Date: December 2015
Abstract: A new approach to generate differential phase contrast (DPC) images for the visualization and quantification of local magnetic fields in a wide range of modern nano materials is reported. In contrast to conventional DPC methods our technique utilizes the idea of a unitary detector under bright field conditions, making it immediately usable by a majority of modern transmission electron microscopes. The approach is put on test to characterize the local magnetization of cylindrical nanowires and their 3D ordered arrays, revealing high sensitivity of our method in a combination with nanometer-scale spatial resolution.
Title: 3D structure of individual nanocrystals in solution by electron microscopy
Authors: Jungwon Park, Hans Elmlund, Peter Ercius, Jong Min Yuk, David T. Limmer, Qian Chen, Kwanpyo Kim, Sang Hoon Han, David A. Weitz, A. Zettl, A. Paul Alivisatos
References:   Science, Vol. 349, Issue 6245, pp. 290-295  
DOI10.1126/science.aab1343
Date: July 2015
Abstract
Title: 3D structure of individual nanocrystals in solution by electron microscopy
Authors: Jungwon Park, Hans Elmlund, Peter Ercius, Jong Min Yuk, David T. Limmer, Qian Chen, Kwanpyo Kim, Sang Hoon Han, David A. Weitz, A. Zettl, A. Paul Alivisatos
References:   Science, Vol. 349, Issue 6245, pp. 290-295  
DOI10.1126/science.aab1343
Date: July 2015
Abstract: Knowledge about the synthesis, growth mechanisms, and physical properties of colloidal nanoparticles has been limited by technical impediments. We introduce a method for determining three-dimensional (3D) structures of individual nanoparticles in solution. We combine a graphene liquid cell, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, a direct electron detector, and an algorithm for single-particle 3D reconstruction originally developed for analysis of biological molecules. This method yielded two 3D structures of individual platinum nanocrystals at near-atomic resolution. Because our method derives the 3D structure from images of individual nanoparticles rotating freely in solution, it enables the analysis of heterogeneous populations of potentially unordered nanoparticles that are synthesized in solution, thereby providing a means to understand the structure and stability of defects at the nanoscale.
Title: Dose limited reliability of quantitative annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy for nano-particle atom-counting
Authors: A. De Backer, G.T. Martinez, K.E. MacArthur, L. Jones, A. Béché, P.D. Nellist, S. Van Aert
References:   Ultramicroscopy, Volume 151, April 2015, Pages 56-61  
Date: April 2015
Abstract
Title: Dose limited reliability of quantitative annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy for nano-particle atom-counting
Authors: A. De Backer, G.T. Martinez, K.E. MacArthur, L. Jones, A. Béché, P.D. Nellist, S. Van Aert
References:   Ultramicroscopy, Volume 151, April 2015, Pages 56-61  
DOI10.1016/j.ultramic.2014.11.028
Date: April 2015
Abstract: Quantitative annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (ADF STEM) has become a powerful technique to characterise nano-particles on an atomic scale. Because of their limited size and beam sensitivity, the atomic structure of such particles may become extremely challenging to determine. Therefore keeping the incoming electron dose to a minimum is important. However, this may reduce the reliability of quantitative ADF STEM which will here be demonstrated for nano-particle atom-counting. Based on experimental ADF STEM images of a real industrial catalyst, we discuss the limits for counting the number of atoms in a projected atomic column with single atom sensitivity. We diagnose these limits by combining a thorough statistical method and detailed image simulations.
Title: Freestanding van der Waals Heterostructures of Graphene and Transition Metal Dichalcogenides
Authors: Amin Azizi, Sarah Eichfeld, Gayle Geschwind, Kehao Zhang, Bin Jian, Debangshu Mukherjee, Lorraine Hossain, Aleksander F. Piasecki, Bernd Kabius, Joshua A. Robinson, and Nasim Alem
References:   ACS Nano, 2015, 9 (5), pp 4882-4890  
Date: April 2015
Abstract
Title: Freestanding van der Waals Heterostructures of Graphene and Transition Metal Dichalcogenides
Authors: Amin Azizi, Sarah Eichfeld, Gayle Geschwind, Kehao Zhang, Bin Jian, Debangshu Mukherjee, Lorraine Hossain, Aleksander F. Piasecki, Bernd Kabius, Joshua A. Robinson, and Nasim Alem
References:   ACS Nano, 2015, 9 (5), pp 4882-4890  
DOI10.1021/acsnano.5b01677
Date: April 2015
Abstract: Vertical stacking of two-dimensional (2D) crystals has recently attracted substantial interest due to unique properties and potential applications they can introduce. However, little is known about their microstructure because fabrication of the 2D heterostructures on a rigid substrate limits one's ability to directly study their atomic and chemical structures using electron microscopy. This study demonstrates a unique approach to create atomically thin freestanding van der Waals heterostructures-WSe2/graphene and MoS2/graphene-as ideal model systems to investigate the nucleation and growth mechanisms in heterostructures. In this study, we use transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging and diffraction to show epitaxial growth of the freestanding WSe2/graphene heterostructure, while no epitaxy is maintained in the MoS2/graphene heterostructure. Ultra-high-resolution aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) shows growth of monolayer WSe2 and MoS2 triangles on graphene membranes and reveals their edge morphology and crystallinity. Photoluminescence measurements indicate a significant quenching of the photoluminescence response for the transition metal dichalcogenides on freestanding graphene, compared to those on a rigid substrate, such as sapphire and epitaxial graphene. Using a combination of (S)TEM imaging and electron diffraction analysis, this study also reveals the significant role of defects on the heterostructure growth. The direct growth technique applied here enables us to investigate the heterostructure nucleation and growth mechanisms at the atomic level without sample handling and transfer. Importantly, this approach can be utilized to study a wide spectrum of van der Waals heterostructures.