Transmission Electron Microscope

Talos F200X for Materials Science

Fastest 200 kV FEG STEM for chemical analysis in multiple dimensions

The FEI Talos F200X scanning/transmission electron microscope combines outstanding high-resolution STEM and TEM imaging with industry-leading energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) signal detection and 3D chemical characterization with compositional mapping. Talos F200X allows for the fastest and most precise EDS analysis in all dimensions (1D-4D), along with the best HRTEM imaging with fast navigation for dynamic microscopy. FEI Talos F200X does all this while also providing the highest stability and longest uptime.




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Highest resolution and throughput in STEM imaging

The FEI Talos F200X STEM delivers the fastest, most precise, quantitative characterization of nanomaterials in multiple dimensions. With innovative features designed to increase throughput, precision, and ease of use, FEI's Talos F200X is ideal for advanced research and analysis across academic, government, and industrial research environments.


Application Examples : Automated 3D EDS with Talos 

FIB prepared battery anode material

EdsEx1

This application example shows the large field of view EDS tomography of a FIB prepared battery anode material consisting of Nickel, Cobalt, Aluminum, and Carbon Black.

Vehicle aged automotive catalyst

Vehicle aged automotive catalyst

This application example shows a large field of view EDS tomography study of a vehicle aged catalyst.

Nanotubes

Nanotubes

This application example shows nanotubes used as electrode material for Na-ion and Li-ion batteries.

Core-shell Nanoparticles

Core-shell Nanoparticles

This application example shows an EDS tomography study of Ag-Pt core-shell nanoparticles with elemental resolution down to a few nanometers.

Featured Accessory

NanoEx-i/v TEM holder

FEI's new specimen heating & biasing holder will expand the capability of your microscope. NanoEx-i/v is the ideal solution for precise experiments in a wide range of applications that require in situ heating of nanomaterial, such as studies of nanoscale annealing behavior, of phase transformations in metals, of structural changes and sintering phenomena in catalyst nanosystems, of quenching, of segregation/diffusion phenomena, and more.

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Publication list for Talos for Materials Science

Title: Gas-assisted electron-beam-induced nanopatterning of high-quality titanium oxide
Authors: A V Riazanova, B N Costanzi, A I Aristov, Y G M Rikers, J J L Mulders, A V Kabashin,E Dan Dahlberg and L M Belova 
References: Nanotechnology ,Volume 27, Number 11
DOI10.1088/0957-4484/27/11/115304
Date: February 2016
Abstract
Title: Gas-assisted electron-beam-induced nanopatterning of high-quality titanium oxide
Authors: A V Riazanova, B N Costanzi, A I Aristov, Y G M Rikers, J J L Mulders, A V Kabashin,E Dan Dahlberg and L M Belova 
References: Nanotechnology ,Volume 27, Number 11
DOI10.1088/0957-4484/27/11/115304
Date: February 2016
Abstract: Electron-beam-induced deposition of titanium oxide nanopatterns is described. The precursor is titanium tetra-isopropoxide, delivered to the deposition point through a needle and mixed with oxygen at the same point via a flow through a separate needle. The depositions are free of residual carbon and have an EDX determined stoichiometry of TiO2.2. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy studies reveal an amorphous structure of the fabricated titanium oxide. Ellipsometric characterization of the deposited material reveals a refractive index of 2.2−2.4 RIU in the spectral range of 500−1700 nm and a very low extinction coefficient (lower than 10−6 in the range of 400−1700 nm), which is consistent with high quality titanium oxide. The electrical resistivity of the titanium oxide patterned with this new process is in the range of 10-40 GΩ cm and the measured breakdown field is in the range of 10-70 V  μ m−1. The fabricated nanopatterns are important for a variety of applications, including field-effect transistors, memory devices, MEMS, waveguide structures, bio- and chemical sensors.
Title: Stability of Y-Ti-O nanoparticles during laser melting of advanced oxide dispersion-strengthened steel powder
Authors: Hye Jung Chang, Hye Young Cho, Jeoung Han Kim
References: Journal of Alloys and Compounds, Volume 653, December 25, 2015, Pages 528-533
DOI10.1016/j.jallcom.2015.08.273
Date: December 2015
Abstract
Title: Stability of Y-Ti-O nanoparticles during laser melting of advanced oxide dispersion-strengthened steel powder
Authors: Hye Jung Chang, Hye Young Cho, Jeoung Han Kim
References: Journal of Alloys and Compounds, Volume 653, December 25, 2015, Pages 528-533
DOI10.1016/j.jallcom.2015.08.273
Date: December 2015
Abstract: The microstructural stability of Y-Ti-O nanoparticles during spot laser beam melting of oxide dispersion- strengthened steel powder is investigated. After the spot laser beam melting, Y2Ti2O7 oxide nanoparticles are successfully retained without dissolution or transformation. However, their particle size is considerably coarser than typical Y2Ti2O7 nanoparticles due to the active agglomeration of the Y-Ti-O nanoparticles, Cr-carbides, and Ar bubbles. In particular, an unexpectedly large volume of Ar bubbles embedded or attached to the Y2Ti2O7 nanoparticles is observed. The Ar gas bubbles seem to accelerate the particle agglomeration. No other phase is observed than Y2Ti2O7 oxide, Cr-carbide and Ar bubble in the sample.
Title: Catalysis: The complexity of intimacy
Authors: Roger Gläser
References: Nature 528, 197-198. December, 10 2015
Date: December 2015
Abstract
Title: Catalysis: The complexity of intimacy
Authors: Roger Gläser
References: Nature 528, 197-198. December, 10 2015
DOI10.1038/528197a
Date: December 2015
Abstract: Catalysts that contain two types of active site split long hydrocarbon molecules into more-useful shorter ones Research into controlling the nanoscale separation of the sites challenges accepted design rules for such catalysts.
Title: Three-dimensional characterization of Gd nanoparticles using STEM-in-SEM tomography in a dual-beam FIB- SEM
Authors: Brandon Van Leer; Cedric Bouchet-Marquis; Huikai Cheng
References: SPIE 9636, Scanning Microscopies 2015, 963606. October 21, 2015
Date: October 2015
Abstract
Title: Three-dimensional characterization of Gd nanoparticles using STEM-in-SEM tomography in a dual-beam FIB- SEM
Authors: Brandon Van Leer; Cedric Bouchet-Marquis; Huikai Cheng
References: SPIE 9636, Scanning Microscopies 2015, 963606. October 21, 2015
DOI10.1117/12.2195530
Date: October 2015
Abstract: A thin section sample of gadolinium nanoparticles ranging in size up to 50 nm mounted on an aluminum substrate was prepared using in-situ lift-out (INLO) by FIB. The sample was thinned using 30 kV Ga+ FIB to approximately 125 nm. Using an in-situ stage with 360 degree continuous tilt, the thin section was imaged every 1 degree with 30 keV SEM and the STEM detector through approximately 125 degrees of tilt. The data set was then reconstructed into a 3D rendering using FEI's tomography reconstruction software, Inspect3D Express, and visualized using FEI's Avizo image and data analysis software. The technique and results compared with conventional TEM and STEM tomography using a 200 keV FEI Talos TEM will be discussed.