|   Electron Microscopy Solutions

    
Electron Microscopy Solutions

Image Gallery

989 images found   |   View all
Back  | 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10  ...  | Next 

Product

SEM

TEM

DualBeam

FIB

Plaster columns

Bi-hydrate calcium sulphate cooked to a temperature of 130 ° C and 200 ° C. The remaining water is removed to obtain anhydrous calcium sulphate (CaSO4) with hexagonal structure.

Courtesy of Marco Casinelli

Taken by Quanta SEM microscope

Magnification: 300x
Sample: CaSO4
Detector: SSD
Voltage: 25 KeV
Vacuum: 0,3 mbar
Horizontal Field Width: 900 μm
Working Distance: 53.0 mm
Spot: 4.5 nA

Ceramic Particles

Ceramic particles imaged at low vacuum in Ultra-High Resolution mode.

Courtesy of Paul Gunning, Smith and Nephew

Taken by Nova NanoSEM microscope

Magnification: 27000x
Detector: Helix
Voltage: 5.00 kV
Horizontal Field Width: 11.1 μm
Working Distance: 3.3mm
Spot: 3.0 nA

Light and shadow

Diamond ripples on the sidewall of a micro cutting tool fabricated by FIB.

Courtesy of Jining Sun

Taken by Quanta 3D microscope

Magnification: 15000
Sample: Diamond
Detector: SE
Voltage: 5 kV
Horizontal Field Width: 9.95 um
Working Distance: 9.9 mm
Spot: 4.5

Glomerular Loops

Glomerular loops from human kidney responsible for blood filtering.

Courtesy of Kinulpe Honorato-Sampaio

Taken by Tecnai microscope

Magnification: 6,800x
Sample: human kidney
Voltage: 80kV
Horizontal Field Width: 2.00 μm
Spot: 3.0

Carbon Tape

FE-SEM image of carbon tape.

Courtesy of Kannan .D

Taken by Quanta 3D microscope

Magnification: 2000x
Sample: carbon
Voltage: 30.0kV
Horizontal Field Width: 30 μm
Working Distance: 10.1mm
Spot: 3.0

WAR IN OUR HUMAN TRENCHES

The captions shows the dramatic encounter, in the liver, of our unsung heroes, the immune cells, and an invading parasite, the trypanosome. Each side bears an impressive arsenal of chemical weapons that will define at the end the unset, or not, of the Sleeping Sickness. Courtesy of Daniel Monteyne, Gilles Vanwalleghem, Etienne Pays, David Pérez-Morga and CMMI at the Université Libre de Bruxelles.

Courtesy of David Pérez-Morga

Taken by Quanta SEM microscope

Magnification: 8658.29x
Sample: Hepatic cells
Detector: Etd SE
Voltage: 20 kV
Horizontal Field Width: 3062.5 μm
Working Distance: 6.85
Spot: 3.00

Crystal with red cells

Crystalline foreign body in contact with red cells in a section of a blood vessel.

Courtesy of Dr. Antonietta Gatti , Nanodiagnostics

Taken by Quanta SEM microscope

Magnification: 8000
Sample: crystal with red cells
Detector: BSE
Voltage: 15
Vacuum: 0.80
Horizontal Field Width: 37.30
Working Distance: 10
Spot: 3.8

Trichomes

Three trichomes are on the leaf margin of Arabidopsis. The images is gotten by cryo-SEM.

Courtesy of Wann-neng Jane

Taken by Quanta SEM microscope

Magnification: 453x
Sample: Leaf
Detector: SE
Voltage: 20KV
Working Distance: 5.9 mm
Spot: 3.0 nA

Alcea Archosauria

Petiole from Alcea Rosea

Courtesy of Laura Schlimgen

Taken by Quanta SEM microscope

Magnification: 200x
Detector: BSE
Voltage: 25 kV
Horizontal Field Width: 100 μm
Working Distance: 10.1 mm
Spot: 6 nA

granules group of lactobacillus Bacteria using in industrial

granules group of lactobacillus Bacteria mixing with olive oil to give high efficiency with yogurt industria it is fixing by glutaraldehyde and dehydration by different concentration of alcohol

Courtesy of Mr. Badar Al-saqer , university of dammam

Taken by Inspect microscope

Magnification: 85X
Sample: bacteria
Detector: SE
Voltage: 15KV
Vacuum: HV
Working Distance: 10mm
Spot: 3.5

Asterias Sea Star Sperms

Two sperms cells of Asterias at Scanning Electron Microscopy.

Courtesy of Mariangela Gentile

Taken by Quanta SEM microscope

Package Bump x-section zoom

Package Bump x-section zoom, Helios G4 PFIB

Taken by Helios G4 PFIB microscope

Infra Red Detector Array

Contact Side of an Infra Red Detector Array seems to be a Flower Garden

Courtesy of Sedat CANLI

Taken by Quanta SEM microscope

Magnification: 1600x
Detector: SE
Voltage: 30 kV
Horizontal Field Width: 200 μm
Working Distance: 42.0
Spot: 6.0

Pep-1, cell penetrating peptide

This is replica of pep-1, cell penetrating peptide prepared by freeze fracture method.

Courtesy of Mr. Han Lee , University of Minnesota

Taken by Tecnai microscope

Magnification: 9,300x

Coral

Image of a Coral reef from Bali (Indonesia)

Courtesy of Dr. Rita Marimon , Universitat Rovira i Virgili

Taken by Quanta SEM microscope

Magnification: 50x
Voltage: 15kV
Working Distance: 19.1mm

Nanocomposite of Polyaniline

Nanocomposite of polyaniline and ferrite after pyrolysis at 600°C under atmosphere of argon. The colors were obtained by software FEI Company.

Courtesy of FRANCISCO RANGEL

Taken by Quanta SEM microscope

Magnification: 12642x
Detector: SE
Voltage: 10 kV
Vacuum: 2.07e-5 mbar
Horizontal Field Width: 20.2 µm.
Working Distance: 10 mm
Spot: 1.5 nA

Morphogenesis of an artery

Figure S11 in http://f1000research.com/articles/2-8/v1

Courtesy of Halina Witkiewicz

Taken by TEM microscope

Galvanized Sheet Steel II

Corrosion product into a galvanized sheet steel after corrosion testing simulating corrosive marine environment.

Courtesy of Mr. FRANCISCO RANGEL , MCTI/INT

Taken by Quanta SEM microscope

Magnification: 1500X
Sample: Galvanized Sheet Steel
Detector: MIX: BSE plus SE
Voltage: 20 kV
Vacuum: 130 Pa
Horizontal Field Width: 199 μm
Working Distance: 14.9
Spot: 3.0

Electrostatic Discharge damages on a MOS transistor Gate

These Silicon filaments are the consequence of an ESD (Electrostatic Discharge) stress applied on a MOS Polysilicon Gate. By creating a Gate leakage, they are responsible of the electronic component failure.

Courtesy of Julien Goxe

Taken by Nova NanoSEM microscope

Magnification: 192000 X
Sample: Silicon
Detector: SE TLD
Voltage: 10 kV
Horizontal Field Width: 1.55 µm
Working Distance: 4.9
Spot: 3.0

Volumetric diffraction

Selected Area Electron Diffraction of Au thin foil, with volumetric rendering based on luminance performed in CRISP (http://www.uma.es/sme/CRISP/).

Courtesy of Mr. Adolfo Martínez , Universidad de Málaga

Taken by TEM microscope

Milled shale sample

Shale sample milled by the V400ACE FIB microscope

Taken by V400ACE microscope

Sample: shale
Voltage: 30 kV
Horizontal Field Width: 59.6 μm
Spot: 80 pA

Ice cream

Pyramidal shape (ice cream like) of a GaP nano-column tipped by a spherical ball containing Ga + In metallic liquid. The metallic ball is coverd by a carbon nano-membrane. The structure was grown by the Metallorganic Chemical Vapor Phase Technique. Courtesy of INT-NE and Professor Marco Sacilotti/UFPE

Courtesy of Mr. FRANCISCO RANGEL , MCTI/INT

Taken by Quanta SEM microscope

Magnification: 45,000x
Sample: GaP + In nano-structure
Detector: ETD
Voltage: 30 kV
Horizontal Field Width: 3.3 μm
Working Distance: 9.7

Honey comb

diatom

Courtesy of Mrs. Zehra Sinem YILMAZ , İzmir Institute of Technology Center for Materials Research

Taken by Quanta SEM microscope

Magnification: 12,500x
Sample: diatom
Detector: SE
Voltage: 5 kV
Vacuum: 3.06e-4 Pa
Horizontal Field Width: 33.2 μm
Working Distance: 8.9
Spot: 3.0

Eggshell

Image of an eggshell, magnified 3900x and colorized.

Courtesy of Matthew Sharp

Taken by Quanta SEM microscope

Magnification: 3898x
Detector: SE
Voltage: 10.0 kV
Horizontal Field Width: 10 μm
Working Distance: 10.77 mm
Spot: 3.0 nA

Gold Mushroom

Gold Nanorods are electrochemically grown to produce SERS active surfaces. Each rod has a diameter of approximately 200nm, however, the length is dependent on the deposition time. If the deposition time is too long, then rods become longer than the template. Without site directed growth, the gold forms larger aggregates, which resulted in the formation of the gold mushroom after the template was removed.

Courtesy of Jay Leitch

Taken by Inspect microscope

Magnification: 2000X
Sample: Gold
Detector: SE
Voltage: 20 KV
Working Distance: 10.2 mm
Spot: 3.5

2017 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

Congratulations to the winners of the 2017 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Three scientists; Dr. Jacques Dubochet, Dr. Joachim Frank, and Dr. Richard Henderson, were awarded the prize for their developments within Cryo-Electron Microscopy.

We are extremely proud of what these researchers and the structural biology community have achieved.