Titan ETEM Themis

The best in situ S/TEM platform gets even better

Understand materials' structure-function relationship by enabling in situ studies at the atomic scale.

In situ observation of structure dynamics at length scales that are characteristic for nanostructures is extremely important to scientists focusing on atomic-scale research.

The FEI Titan™ ETEM Themis builds on the proven Titan ETEM concept-combining both standard S/TEM and dedicated environmental TEM capabilities for time-resolved, in situ studies of the dynamic behavior of nanomaterials.

The Titan ETEM Themis is designed as a fully integrated platform for in situ experiments, such as exposing nanostructures to gaseous reaction/operating environments.





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Key features:

Building on advantages of our proven Titan ETEM solution, including:

  • Automation and ease-of-use through full software control of all operational parameters - for novice users as well as advanced operators.
  • Window-free imaging through innovative differentially-pumped objective lens.
  • Precise control of vacuum system including fast switching between different vacuum modes.
  • Accurate monitoring of gas composition through built-in reactant gas analysis via mass-spectrometer (RGA).
  • Easy decontamination and system flushing via the integrated plasma cleaner.
  • Electron gun protection to maintain high vacuum even during gaseous experiments 
  • Fine electron dose (rate) control using flexible gun lens and condenser settings.
  • Easy sample handling , full double tilt capability and standard TEM holder compatibility through innovative differentially-pumped specimen area.
  • Safe operation mode through full compliance with safety regulations and protocols for gas handling.


Advance your research with the new Titan ETEM Themis.

The new FEI Titan ETEM  now also benefits from Titan Themis features:

  • Precise control and knowledge of sample temperature in any gas environment through new NanoEx-i/v heating stage.
  • Improved sample stability, navigation, and assisted sample drift correction in x, y, and z axes using a piezo enhanced stage.
  • Advancing high-quality imaging and movie acquisition functions , as well as sample navigation by combining speed, high sensitivity, and high-dynamic range with large field of view in one single Ceta 16M camera.
  • Handling and processing of large data sets by introducing a 64-bit operating system.

Titan ETEM webcasts

Watch the Materials Today  webcast  and learn more about  "Imaging heterogeneous catalysts in the working state" .

Watch the C&EN  webcast  and learn more about "Direct, atomic-scale observation of catalysts under (near) operation condition using Environmental TEM" .

Featured Accessory

Titan Upgrades & Accessories

Designed to update and enhance the capabilities of your Titan

FEI has continuously increased the capabilities of the Titan product family. We can offer to each Titan user upgrades to the latest available technology.

See accessory

Documents

ETEM Application Note

FEI’s Titan ETEM is the dedicated atomic-resolution Scanning/Transmission Electron Microscope (S/TEM) solution for time-resolved studies of the behavior of nanomaterials during exposure to reactive gas environments and elevated temperatures. Designed specifically for these in situ, dynamic experiments in catalysis, Titan ETEM features a unique, innovative differentially pumped objective lens for window- free imaging, and gas inlets for safe application of inert and reactive gas.

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Publication list for Titan ETEM for Materials Science

Title: Stable amorphous georgeite as a precursor to a high-activity catalyst
Authors: Simon A. Kondrat, Paul J. Smith, Peter P. Wells, Philip A. Chater, James H. Carter, David J. Morgan, Elisabetta M. Fiordaliso, Jakob B. Wagner, Thomas E. Davies, Li Lu, Jonathan K. Bartley, Stuart H. Taylor, Michael S. Spencer, Christopher J. Kiely, Gordon J. Kelly, Colin W. Park, Matthew J. Rosseinsky, Graham J. Hutchings
References: Nature (2016)  
DOI10.1038/nature16935
Date: February 2016
Abstract
Title: Stable amorphous georgeite as a precursor to a high-activity catalyst
Authors: Simon A. Kondrat, Paul J. Smith, Peter P. Wells, Philip A. Chater, James H. Carter, David J. Morgan, Elisabetta M. Fiordaliso, Jakob B. Wagner, Thomas E. Davies, Li Lu, Jonathan K. Bartley, Stuart H. Taylor, Michael S. Spencer, Christopher J. Kiely, Gordon J. Kelly, Colin W. Park, Matthew J. Rosseinsky, Graham J. Hutchings
References: Nature (2016)  
DOI10.1038/nature16935
Date: February 2016
Abstract: Copper and zinc form an important group of hydroxycarbonate minerals that include zincian malachite, aurichalcite, rosasite and the exceptionally rare and unstable-and hence little known and largely ignored-georgeite. The first three of these minerals are widely used as catalyst precursors for the industrially important methanol-synthesis and low-temperature water-gas shift (LTS) reactions, with the choice of precursor phase strongly influencing the activity of the final catalyst. The preferred phase is usually zincian malachite. This is prepared by a co-precipitation method that involves the transient formation of georgeite; with few exceptions it uses sodium carbonate as the carbonate source, but this also introduces sodium ions-a potential catalyst poison. Here we show that supercritical antisolvent (SAS) precipitation using carbon dioxide , a process that exploits the high diffusion rates and solvation power of supercritical carbon dioxide to rapidly expand and supersaturate solutions, can be used to prepare copper/zinc hydroxycarbonate precursors with low sodium content. These include stable georgeite, which we find to be a precursor to highly active methanol-synthesis and superior LTS catalysts. Our findings highlight the value of advanced synthesis methods in accessing unusual mineral phases, and show that there is room for exploring improvements to established industrial catalysts.
Title: Oxidation of Carbon Nanotubes in an Ionizing Environment
Authors: Ai Leen Koh, Emily Gidcumb, Otto Zhou, and Robert Sinclair
References: Nano Lett. 16 (2), 856-863 (2016)
DOI10.1021/acs.nanolett.5b03035
Date: January 2016
Abstract
Title: Oxidation of Carbon Nanotubes in an Ionizing Environment
Authors: Ai Leen Koh, Emily Gidcumb, Otto Zhou, and Robert Sinclair
References: Nano Lett. 16 (2), 856-863 (2016)
DOI10.1021/acs.nanolett.5b03035
Date: January 2016
Abstract: In this work, we present systematic studies on how an illuminating electron beam which ionizes molecular gas species can influence the mechanism of carbon nanotube oxidation in an environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM). We found that preferential attack of the nanotube tips is much more prevalent than for oxidation in a molecular gas environment. We establish the cumulative electron doses required to damage carbon nanotubes from 80 keV electron beam irradiation in gas versus in high vacuum. Our results provide guidelines for the electron doses required to study carbon nanotubes within or without a gas environment, to determine or ameliorate the influence of the imaging electron beam. This work has important implications for in situ studies as well as for the oxidation of carbon nanotubes in an ionizing environment such as that occurring during field emission.
Title: Influence on nickel particle size on the hydrodeoxygenation of phenol over Ni/SiO2
Authors: Peter M. Mortensen, Jan-Dierk Grunwaldt, Peter A. Jensen, Anker D. Jensen
References: Catalysis Today 259, 277-284 (2016)  
Date: January 2016
Abstract
Title: Influence on nickel particle size on the hydrodeoxygenation of phenol over Ni/SiO2
Authors: Peter M. Mortensen, Jan-Dierk Grunwaldt, Peter A. Jensen, Anker D. Jensen
References: Catalysis Today 259, 277-284 (2016)  
DOI10.1016/j.cattod.2015.08.022
Date: January 2016
Abstract: Hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of phenol over nickel nano-particles of different size (5-22 nm) supported on SiO 2  has been investigated in a batch reactor at 275 °C and 100 bar. Deoxygenation was only observed as a consecutive step of initial hydrogenation of phenol at the given conditions. Both the hydrogenation and deoxygenation reaction were found to be Ni-particle size dependent. Rapid hydrogenation of phenol to cyclohexanol was achieved over the catalysts with large particles, while the rate of deoxygenation of cyclohexanol was slow. For the catalysts with small Ni particles, the opposite behavior was observed Specifically, the turn over frequency (TOF) of hydrogenation was 85 times slower for 5 nm particles than for 22 nm particles. On the contrary, the TOF of cyclohexanol deoxygenation increased by a factor of 20 when decreasing the particle size from 20 nm to 5 nm. A simple kinetic model showed that the rate limiting step for phenol HDO shifted from deoxygenation to hydrogenation when the particle size was below 9-10 nm. Surface site population theory evidenced that the deoxygenation reactions were favored on step/corner sites, giving higher deoxygenation rates at small particles. For hydrogenation, the influence of particle size on the rate could be related to the size of the Ni facets with larger facets thus being better.
Title: In-situ transmission electron microscopy study of surface oxidation for Ni–10Cr and Ni–20Cr alloys
Authors: Langli Luo, Lianfeng Zou, Daniel K. Schreiber, Donald R. Baer, Stephen M. Bruemmer, Guangwen Zhou, Chong-Min Wang
References: Scripta Materialia 114, 129-132 (2016)
Date: December 2015
Abstract
Title: In-situ transmission electron microscopy study of surface oxidation for Ni–10Cr and Ni–20Cr alloys
Authors: Langli Luo, Lianfeng Zou, Daniel K. Schreiber, Donald R. Baer, Stephen M. Bruemmer, Guangwen Zhou, Chong-Min Wang
References: Scripta Materialia 114, 129-132 (2016)
DOI10.1016/j.scriptamat.2015.11.031
Date: December 2015
Abstract: The early-stage oxidation of Ni (001) thin films alloyed with 10 or 20 at.% Cr at 700 °C has been directly visualized using  in-situ  TEM. Independent of Cr concentration, the oxidation initiates  via  nucleation of surface NiO islands and subsurface Cr 2 O 3 . The NiO grows and transitions into a continuous film, followed by the nucleation and growth of NiCr 2 O 4  islands. For Ni-20 at.% Cr, a continuous Cr 2 O 3  was developed, but not for Ni-10 at.% Cr. NiO whiskers are observed to preferentially nucleate/grow from the NiCr 2 O 4 islands through a short-circuit diffusion of Ni along the NiCr 2 O 4  interfaces in Ni-10 at.% Cr.